Politicians: Listen to that Famous Kennedy Line – Ask Not …

Though John Fitzgerald Kennedy did not spend a long time in the White House he did accomplish some very meaningful actions while he occupied the nation’s top seat.

The Bay of Pigs, though possibly viewed by some as a fiasco, was handled well, and the Cuban Missile Crisis was an exceptionally tough time for any political figure where success was ultimately accomplished, while his work fowarding civil rights positively changed the course of the nation.

When looking at JFK’s political career one of the most meaningful points he ever expressed, and was evident in various of his actions while he served, was during his innaugural address.

Towards the end of that speech he stated, And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.

Unfortunately, most politicians lean exactly the opposite of President Kennedy. It certainly appears that they are trying to figure out how the United States can do more, provide more, hand out more, to fellow Americans. Much of this is, more than likely, done to garner votes for their always-upcoming re-election.

Regardless, each piece of legislation the nation’s elected officials vote into existence that, basically, provides either something for nothing or continually expands the public sector by increasing its size and scope with added personnel and payroll (as well as health and retirement benefits) primarily results in more and more financial burden for Main Street USA and a growing federal budget deficit.

Case in point, is the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) which poured billions of dollars into public works through the public sector, with no meaningful statistics to show.

Had that money been channeled into the private sector through bidding contracts that would be awarded to companies there may have been some positive change that could be measured. And this would have been acccomplished with less cost to American taxpayers.

The economy cannot be fixed by increasing the size of the public sector. If, and when, politicans learn this simple truth the country will begin to better itself.

It is not the government’s job, nor purpose as outlined in the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, to have become an overly massive bureaucracy that ends up taxing it’s citizens to death in the attempt to cover all the costs necessary to pay for immediate, and future, costs of their myriad programs.

And though JFK was human and had his share of flaws, as pointed out by the 2011 The Kennedys six-hour mini-series, he did have a fairly good idea of the activities and actions that government should and should not be doing or areas where government should or should not become involved.

Over For Now.

Main Street One