The Origins and Anniversary of our Bill of Rights

BillOfRightsContrary to what some seem to think or believe today, the Bill of Rights is not a Bill of Needs.

On September 17, 1787 our Founding Fathers created the Constitution of the United States.  It then had to go through a ratification, or approval, process in each state.  Nine states were required to approve the document for it to become official for the country.  In the end, all of them did.

However, there was a slight problem.

The Constitution, as written, laid out the foundations for the federal government fairly well but there were no guarantees, nor even a mention, of state or individual rights, that for which they all fought during the American Revolution.

In contrast, the previous semi-governing document, the Articles of Confederation (the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union), which was ratified on March 1, 1781, at least contained language to preserve the independence and sovereignty of the states.

anti-federalistsLed by people such as Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams and George Mason, the Anti-Federalists (as they came to be know) believed that the Constitution needed a Bill of Rights; that it created a presidency so powerful it might be turned into a tyrannical monarchy; that the document did not do enough with the courts with the result being an out-of-control judiciary; and, that the federal government would be unresponsive to the needs of the states and the people.

A war of words ensued.

The Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, wished to leave the Constitution alone.  They did not feel that any type of Bill of Rights was needed.

Madison wrote, “The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.”

Federalist-PapersHowever, they were not spelled out nor guaranteed in any way, thus leaving open the possibility for their encroachment.

Written guarantees won out.  On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights was ratified.

What exactly was the purpose of these 10 amendments?

The Bill of Rights added specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights.

It does NOT grant us those rights.

It guarantees them.

If you recall, from the Declaration of Independence, our Founders believed in our unalienable rights, not man- or government-granted, but given to us by our Creator.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

The Bill of Rights also defined, more clearly, limitations on government power in judicial and other proceedings. And, one other huge point, that all powers not specifically delegated to Congress are reserved for the states or the people.

Today, let us thank our Founding Fathers for the foresight and wisdom they had in providing these documents but also pray that those elected representatives who took an Oath to support and defend the Constitution start doing so.  In all areas and at all times.  Not just when it is convenient for their political agenda.

But, also keep in mind that we have lost some rights.  Some have been, otherwise limited.

JeffersonIt is up to each and every one of us to demand that our elected representatives are reminded of this truth, as written by Thomas Jefferson:
“Our legislators are not sufficiently apprized of the rightful limits of their power; that their true office is to declare and enforce only our natural rights and duties, and to take none of them from us.”

Ensure that you and your family know your rights.  Only then can you protect them.

There are many paths to educate yourself and your family. Learn the basics by watching the award-winning In Search of Liberty Constitution movie, and then, for in-depth study, enroll in a Constitution Boot Camp from Building Blocks for Liberty or join KrisAnne Hall’s Liberty First University.

Staying true to our US Constitution we can safeguard freedom in America for ourselves and our posterity.

We the People - Scott D Welch

 

by Scott D. Welch, Patriot
Direct descendant of 8 Americans who fought in the Revolutionary War
Cousin of Patrick Henry

Click for a printable copy of the Bill of Rights.

Betsy Ross - G Washington - God Bless

 

Never Forget – Always Remember – 9/11

Unfortunately, September 11th is a day remembered for tragedy. In 2001 with terrorist attacks in NY, DC and PA, and in 2012 with an administration failing to protect US citizens in Benghazi (and then lying about it).

Statue of Liberty - World Trade Center

Benghazi

A moment of silence for all of our fellow Americans who fell on those two horrible days.

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Memorial Day 2018 – Recognizing Those Who Died While Serving

Decorating graves of soldiers with flowers is an ancient tradition.  In America, while there is some evidence it occurred prior to, the practice took on a more-known and more-practiced tradition during and after the United States Civil War.

Memorial Day, earlier known as Decoration Day, is a tradition of remembering, honoring and decorating the graves of those who died while serving in the military with flowers and/or U.S. Flags.

This specific holiday provides a ritual expression to the themes of death, sacrifice and re-birth and, in general, provides the people of America with a renewed sense of nationalism.

Whether every U.S. citizen realizes it or not, the unparalleled freedom and liberty that we have and enjoy is definitely not free.  It was taken with weapons and lives during the American Revolution and it has persevered through the centuries where tyrants, fascists and uncompromising terrorists have attempted world domination and control, again through the use of weapons and the loss of life.

While war is not the ideal solution to world political issues it has been necessary when those suppressive and oppressive individuals, such as Adolph Hitler, do not respond to reason or diplomacy, unless it was for another country to unconditionally surrender to the dictator’s every wish and whim. During and following those times, when soldiers answer the call to defend their country, we are eternally grateful to them.

So, to all who served, who gave their all and more, we remember and honor you…and we thank you for your ultimate sacrifice in helping us keep our freedom intact.

Constitution Day 2017

Gadsden Flag - Don't Tread On MeWith many of our rights and freedoms under assault at this time, it makes sense to honor our Founding Fathers for the work that they did over two centuries ago.

When they had experienced enough tyranny from King George III of England, when their pleas and requests were shunned or ignored, when the Brits ordered trade blockades, and more, much much more, they went to war and drafted and signed the Declaration of Independence, on July 4, 1776.  They did so knowing full well that it would mean losing everything if the Revolutionary War was lost.  But America prevailed.  It won its freedom.

They were quite learned men, many of them knew historically what had made for good and for bad governments, knowing full well that a good government was one that did not encroach upon the citizenry.  Yes, they haggled and argued and compromised.  But they never lost sight of the end result and that was the United States Constitution, formally signed exactly 230 years ago today, on September 17, 1787.

The document that our Founding Fathers created and signed was like no other ever devised, especially when the Bill of Rights was added on December 15, 1791.  Our freedom, as long as the US Constitution is followed, is guaranteed.

Signing_of_the_Constitution_of_the_United_StatesThere are those who question a document 200+ years old and how it can be relevant today.  There is an easy answer.  In the manner in which it was written.  There were no time-specific conditions, other than handling the then-current debt.  The Constitution and the Bill of Rights were created by forward-looking men, men who knew the world would change and provided us with something that could and would grow with us.

It is unfortunate, however, that we have allowed that precious document to be “interpreted” to mean what it does not say.  As one example, when the Courts decided that prayers could not be said in school those justices were violating our Constitution.  If there are some who do not wish to pray in school, that is fine.  But there is nothing unconstitutional about saying prayer in school.  Period.

Losing that portion of one of our rights should infuriate any Patriot because what follows is that there are other rights, other freedoms that get taken from us, gradually and (now) generally under the guise of “national security.”  We need to watch our present-day politicians, as they are not statesmen of 200 years  ago who carry on open discussion, and even arguments, to reach a consensus of what is right “for the people.”  No, politicians of today are bought and paid for by myriad individuals and concerns.

Forgive me as I have strayed from my original thought, thanking our Founding Fathers for their excellent work.  For their work should be admired as much as it should be followed.  Incredible documents outlining our rights, our freedoms, our liberty.

In our movie, In Search of Liberty, we educate all Americans, in a dramatic yet humorous manner, the basics of what exactly the US Constitution and Bill of Rights guarantee us, i.e., “We the People.”  All those who have viewed it come away new information they did not know before and with a renewed sense of both pride and purpose as an American.

Over For Now.

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