Foodie Break: Hamburger Art

Though the origin of the “first” hamburger is, and has been, in hot dispute for over a century, there are reports dating back to 1885 of 15-year old Charlie Nagreen who served a meatball between two slices of bread at a fair in Wisconsin.

Western BBQ Burger
Western BBQ Burger

There are two reports from 1891 claiming the distinction of a hamburger, while the first “news coverage” appeared on July 5, 1896, in the Chicago Daily Tribune regarding a “hamburger sandwich.”

Bleu Cheese Burger
Bleu Cheese Burger

Regardless of exactly when and where the beloved hamburger originated, at the 1904 World’s Fair, held in St. Louis, Missouri (USA), it seemed to have become a rage, being sold by numerous street vendors. And the rest, they say, is history.

Manhattan Burger
Manhattan Burger

White Castle restaurants, which began in Kansas in 1921, were the first fast-food chain to serve a burger, though their offerings were the small versions (2.5 inches square), also known as “sliders.”

Kobe Burger
Kobe Burger

While there are some fast-food establishments that serve a good and tasty hamburger (In-N-Out Burger comes to mind) there are countless restaurants selling burgers ranging in cost from $10 to $25 (and much, much more if you search hard enough) in an effort to satisfy the American palate, adding several types of other foods/vegetables on top of the patty in order to win the ever-present flavor contest.

The Big Baja Burger
The Big Baja Burger

And, of course, it must be served with an order of fries for this Foodie to qualify it as Hamburger Art.

Foie Gras Steak Burger
Foie Gras Steak Burger

For Foodies, being able to sit down, relax and truly savor a world-class tasting burger becomes something akin to a highly satisfying and sacred rite.

Over For Now.

Main Street One

Favorite Flowers – The Parrot Tulip

The exotic plumage of the Parrot Tulip is unlike any other of the species, as it is quite scalloped with fringed edges and most often appears multi-colored.

Parrot Tulip Orange Favorite

So named due to the beak-shaped buds resembling that of the tropical bird species, the Parrot Tulip features petals that are flamboyant and dynamic.

Parrot Tulip FantasyThe stems may range anywhere between 12 and 18 inches in height and, in full bloom, the petals open to four or more inches in diameter. Coloring varies widely among the Parrot Tulip. Some of the more common are: yellow, peach, orange, red, purple and white.

Parrot Tulip Orange FavoriteThe various color combinations of the Parrot Tulip are, quite simply, striking, making this flower an excellent choice for gardens, weddings, or, virtually, any special occasion.

Parrot Tulip FantasyThis late-blooming species is, however, quite vulnerable to harsh Spring occurances such as a very heavy rain or strong wind.

Parrot Tulip Orange FavoriteLast, but not least, the Parrot Tulip also poses quite well for any photographer.

Over For Now.

Main Street One

Nikon Nikkor 70-200mm f4G ED VR Lens Review

Preface: This will not be a technical review, such as the ones Ken Rockwell writes, but simply my experience using this excellent lens. If needed, there are ample tech specs at NikonUSA.com.

Nikkor 70-200 f4 Nikon D7000
Nikkor 70-200 f4 with Nikon D7000 DSLR

This lens is fantastic!  I had been debating between this and Nikon’s f/2.8 version and opted to purchase the f4 primarily due to price, but also the very good reviews and recommendations/suggestions from others.  Aside from saving $1,000 over the f/2.8, I have not yet found that I have lost anything in the bargain.  Yes, I realize there may be times when I wish I had the f/2.8 but being able to adjust the ISO on my D7000 that time has not yet come.

Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm f4G ED VR
Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm f4G ED VR

Images are razor sharp with very little vignetting or distortion and the colors are vibrant.  Yes, vibrant.  When you add that to the weight being about half of the f/2.8, due to no tripod collar and less glass, this lens is one that will be staying with me for a long time to come.  Speaking of the tri-pod collar – the balance without it is such that when I use my Manfrotto 3221W tri-pod with the 804RC2 pan/tilt head it is really a non-issue.  And, as Nikon continues to improve on their already great VR (Vibration Reduction) technology, this f4, with the latest generation VR, really does not need a tri-pod in the vast majority of shots I have taken, or will be taking.  For those times when it is quite dark, yes, I would need the tri-pod, as well as for some video shoots.  But, when you want, or need, to walk around shooting with this lens that reduction in weight (the lens as well as the tri-pod) is totally priceless.

The f/2.8 will produce slightly better bokeh (background blur) in almost all cases but that also depends on circumstances. I have been quite pleased with the results I have achieved thus far.  The construction of the lens seems very good.  Yes, it is mostly plastic, but isn’t almost everything nowadays.  If you don’t accidentally drop it you should be fine.

Close-Up Portrait of a Bridesmaid
Close-Up Portrait of a Bridesmaid

Focusing the f/4 is quite smooth, and fast, and the lens hunts very very little.  That it is only a 67mm lens (as opposed to 77mm size of the f/2.8) will save a little cash on No Density (ND), Ultra Violet (UV) and/or Circular Polarizer (CPL) filters.  I happen to use Hoya filters and they screw on and off effortlessly.  And, like all Nikon lenses, this 70-200mm f/4 attaches to the body in a snap.  For many people, like me, this is an absolutely incredible lens, especially for the price (and weight) difference.  It is highly recommended.

Over For Now.

Main Street One