Drugs Vs Health – Who Wins?

Just another expose on Big PhRMA.

In the following video interview, a bit over seven minutes long, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks quite frankly about the drug Thimerosal and the affect it has had on the human body, including the horrific rise of autism-born babies. There is, admittedly, a lot of debate conerning this drug and the disease. However, the points made by RFK Jr are compelling.


When will people learn that just because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues a “stamp of approval” on a drug that it does not make that product safe. Witness the birth defects now tied to anti-depressants: cardiac (heart), pulmonary (lung), neural-tube defects (brain and spinal cord), craniosynostosis (skull defect), infant omphalocele (abdominal wall defects), club foot (one or both feet turn downward and inward), and anal atresia (complete or partial closure of the anus), among others.

Food for thoght…and action.

Over For Now.

Main Street One

And Yet Another "Syndrome" Is Created

It seems that as the world becomes more complex, in order to deal with the challenges of everyday life, labels must be created.

The latest is “Computer Stress Syndrome.”

This is yet another syndrome to add to the, literally, hundreds that have been named to identify a disorder experienced by the average person.

It is probably also the first step required for pharmaceutical companies to create a new wonder drug to alleviate the pain, anxiety and frustration attached to it.

The first line in a story released Tuesday claimed, “Crashing machines, slow boot times, and agony dealing with technical support have Digital Age people suffering from Computer Stress Syndrome…”

As reported by Agence France-Presse (AFP), the “findings were based on a survey of more than 1,000 people in North America by a Customer Experience Board created by the Chief Marketing Officer Council to look into how to keep customers happy in the highly competitive communications sector.”

On its website, the Customer Experience Board states, “Today’s digitally dependent consumers are increasingly overwhelmed and upset with technical glitches and problems in their daily lives. The source of their pain: frustrating, complex computers and devices, technical failures, viral infections, and long waits to resolve support issues that disrupt the flow of their work and personal lives.”

They call their study “Combating Computer Stress Syndrome: Barriers and Best Practices in Tech Support.”

Enter, from stage left, the doctor who seized the moment.

The AFP article states, “Murray Feingold, a US physician credited in the study with giving CSS its label.”

Thank you, Feingold!

You came up with yet another syndrome and people around the planet will be able to think about you when they pop their little pill to make it all better, while drug companies make even more billions of dollars profit creating additional members of the Great Drug Society.

Yes, Virginia, there is a Great Drug Society-you are living in it now.

The Great Drug Society, led by the pharmaceutical industry (PhRMA), takes in close to One Trillion Dollars annually, worldwide and, at least in the United States, spends upwards of 40% of its budget on advertising and public relations campaigns designed to make people want drugs.

This Main Streeter does not subscribe to all of the various syndromes that have been created in order to add to PhRMA’s profits. And, please keep in mind that the drug will not do anything to speed up tech support.

Speaking of support…when was the last time anyone was truly satisfied with a customer service call?

It is a sure bet that everyone enjoys listening to recorded voices advising which number button to push in order to reach the proper person for assistance and then being told that all representatives are busy but that you are a valued customer, so please wait and listen to this music. (These surely must be symptoms of Phone Button Syndrome and Phone Waiting Music Syndrome.)

On still a lighter note, the following video discusses “Hourglass Syndrome,” which has, basically, the same “symptoms” as the aforementioned (though not the dreaded tech support issue).


Over For Now.

Main Street One

How Polls Can Be Skewed

A recent poll released just prior to the House of Representatives’ vote on Main Street USA’s Health Care Right bill shows what can be accomplished when enough rhetoric is thrown at a topic.

According to HealthDay News, “Nearly half of Americans are ‘extremely’ or ‘very worried’ about rising costs for health care and health insurance, and a majority place the blame on drug and insurance company profits, a new Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll finds.”

There were many on Capitol Hill who had assailed the insurance companies and their profits, in particular, for rising healthcare costs, making them, in essence, the “bad guy.”
 
The article in HealthDay News continued by saying, “Some health economists say insurance and pharmaceutical company (PhRMA) profits amount to only about 2 percent of total health care spending.
 
“Instead, fees charged by doctors and hospitals, as well as expanding use of increasingly sophisticated and expensive health-care technologies, are the primary cause of escalating health-care costs, these experts contend.”
 
The article, interestingly enough, does not elaborate on the fact that 44% of those surveyed felt that higher costs were due to “more tests, treatments and procedures ordered by doctors due to malpractice worries.”
 
Aside from the possibility of more tests, there is clear and present evidence that escalating malpractice insurance premiums are caused by astronomical punitive damages awarded.
 
Tort Reform should definitely play a major role in health care reform.
 
Nowhere in the poll does it mention fraud or corruption within the medical industry as contributing to higher costs, yet it does exist.
 
More than likely many Americans know that medical offices have two sets of charges. A lower price if someone is paying their own way and a higher price if the care is billed to an insurance company. This is, in reality, fradulant.
 
The reasons given often have to do with payments not being made in a timely manner or even that payments for those services do not ever arrive.
 
Regardless of the reason for the disparity, that is just another of the many causes for the higher costs of medical care.
 
In this fairly balanced article, there is the point made by Humphrey Taylor, chairman of The Harris Poll, a service of Harris Interactive. He said, “These findings show how little most people understand the economics of health care. Increased profits of insurers and drug companies (if they have increased at all) cannot possibly account for the increases in premiums. Many health-care economists attribute the increased cost of care to increased demand and utilization, increased prices and the increased use of expensive tests and treatments. Most people, as shown here, do not think of these as the main drivers of increased health-care spending.”
 
The poll results do show that if enough high-profile people speak out against something often enough that polls can, indeed, be skewed by incorrect information disseminated.
 
Over For Now.
 
Main Street One